This week:

  • The email marketing guide that 2.5xed my conversion rate
  • How much money can you make on Amazon Mechanical Turk?
  • “Influencers are bullshit”
  • 10 ideas to strengthen your business network
  • Two bloggers who earned $50,000+ last month
  • First digital, then nomadic
  • When to publish content on Medium (and when not to)
  • JobRack: an Upwork alternative with a twist
  • $15-20k/month teaching people how to use software
  • Weird ways to make money online: Puppets and Ultimate Frisbee

The email marketing guide that 2.5xed my conversion rate

Backlinko calls it “the definitive guide” to email marketing, and they might be right.

I recently implemented some of the advice in chapter 2 and have seen a 2.5x increase in conversions of website visitors to email subscribers.

(7 day period before changes = 0.21% conversion rate. 7 day period after changes = 0.54% conversion rate.)

Here’s what I did:

  • Added a newsletter link to my main navigation.
  • Embedded email captures within the content of popular posts.
  • Added a big opt-in to the top of my homepage and removed the navigation.
  • Removed the slide-in email capture that would show on 25% scroll down the page.
  • Added an exit-intent pop-up to all pages. (I use Thrive Leads for this.)

All pretty simple stuff I should have been doing anyway, but Backlinko has a knack for explaining clearly what works best and why.

The full guide is a must-read if you do any email marketing.

How much money can you make on Amazon Mechanical Turk?

Mechanical Turk is a “microjobs” site from Amazon where you can get paid to perform small tasks.

Apparently there are more than 500,000 workers on there.

The Hustle reports:

A 2018 academic study analyzed 3.8m tasks completed by 2,676 workers on MTurk and found that average earnings through the platform amounted to $2 per hour. Only 4% of all workers earned more than the federal minimum wage of $7.25/hour.

As I scour the internet looking for legit ways to earn money online – so I can share them with you – it boggles my mind to see so many people spending serious time on sites like MTurk for very little reward.

Please don’t be one of those people.

If your most marketable “skill” is an ability to mindlessly click on stuff, you’re never going to earn very much.

Go learn some real skills that the market values and you’ll fare much better.

Related:

“Influencers are bullshit”

So says Nomadic Matt, a writer who has been traveling the world for 10 years now and earned millions of dollars along the way.

An excerpt:

calling yourself an influencer is all about you. That means all you’re doing is talking about yourself and trying to show your best life on social media — while then often complaining about how many hours you work and how hard it is.

You know why it’s hard? Because, since you don’t really create anything of value to others, you have to hustle for every dollar. Because if your goal is to get free travel and do cool stuff for yourself, the internet will quickly tire of you. No one wants to read endless stories of someone doing things they can never do.

Matt also published a piece on Entrepreneur.com this week that gives more insights into his business: How to Start (and Run) a 7-Figure Business While Traveling the World

10 ideas to strengthen your business network

Some wise head once said, “Your network is your net worth.”

Given that, it’s smart to regularly build and strengthen your relationships with other good folks online.

These tips from Caroline Leon are deceptively simple, but do even one or two of them regularly and you’ll be the most popular kid at the pajama party.

Take this one, for example:

8. Reach out to your biggest fans, those people who like and comment on all of your posts. Send them a direct and personal message to thank them and to find out how they are. If after you’ve made the initial connection there’s an obvious way you could support them, offer your help generously.

What do you think would happen if you did that just once per day consistently?

Two bloggers who earned $50,000+ last month

First is Ryan Robinson, who earned $54,923.08.

Second is Michelle Schroeder-Gardner, who doesn’t reveal exact numbers but most likely earned more than $100,000 (she’s been earning at least that every month for several years).

Interesting that both of them earn so much as affiliates for Bluehost.

Now you know why every second blog you come across has a free “how to start a blog” course with a Bluehost affiliate link 😉

By the way, whenever I discover blogs earning big money, I like to look them up on Ahrefs and see what content is bringing them the most organic (i.e. search engine) traffic.

For the two blogs above:

First digital, then nomadic

For the past two years, Jason Fieber has been living in the center of the digital nomad universe – Chiang Mai, Thailand.

As such, he’s met many an aspiring digital nomad, and reckons the failure rate is massive:

The failure rate among all of the digital nomads I’ve personally met has gotta be way over 90%. Maybe even closer to 99%. I mean that in terms of them going back home and returning to job XYZ.

His explanation for that:

Going from $0 to $1,000 per month online is tough. Giving yourself every possible advantage makes perfect sense to me.

But the constant bouncing around – i.e., being nomadic – is totally counterproductive to this.

Making money online is challenging. Traveling constantly is also challenging. Doing these two challenging things at the same time is a terrible idea.

Related: we featured Jason in a case study a few months back —> This Guy Retired In His 30s And Lives Off Dividends In Thailand

When to publish content on Medium (and when not to)

Well-reasoned advice from Tim Soulo:

  • Publish posts with search traffic potential on your own blog
  • Publish posts on topics without search potential on Medium

JobRack: an Upwork alternative with a twist

I came across JobRack a couple of weeks ago and have been checking it out before sharing on here.

It’s like Upwork in that you can hire and get hired for freelance and remote jobs, but with a few key differences:

  • You can only join as a “jobseeker” if you’re from Eastern Europe.
  • There are no fees for jobseekers.
  • Employers pay a one-time fee for each job post.
  • The focus is on long-term engagements rather than one-time projects.
  • JobRack has great reviews on Facebook and lots of upvotes on Product Hunt.

Via email, I asked the folks at JobRack what the competition is like for freelancers on the site.

Their response:

On average we have around 20-25 applicants on the job post. It all differs from job to job, but we always work our best for our employers to find them exactly what they are looking for. It’s not just that employers post the job and we wait until job seekers apply for them. We dedicate time to each and every job post to understand what the employer needs, and after that, we do our best to find him someone like that.

Give JobRack a look if you’re from Eastern Europe or looking to hire some good help.

$15-20k/month teaching people how to use software

Here’s an interview with a chap named Paul Minors who apparently earns up to $20,000 a month as a “virtual consultant.”

He basically helps businesses and individuals get to grips with software like:

  • Asana
  • Pipedrive
  • MailChimp
  • Zapier

As per Paul’s website, he earned more than $1,400 in his first month doing this kind of work.

Are you an expert user of any software yourself?

If so, there may be people out there who will pay you to help them use it more effectively.

The notes from the interview linked above explain how Paul found his first clients:

He started off by making a profile on Clarity.fm in early 2016. Clarity is a site that connects experts with people seeking help/answers for a $ amount per minute. Paul listed Asana as one of his skills, and he started getting calls from people in need of help. Paul also did a few calls for free to help build some traction on the platform and get some reviews.

He said the platform was a great way to validate his consulting business and prove there was demand for Asana consulting. Some of the callers became clients off the platform too.

Weird ways to make money online: Puppets and Ultimate Frisbee

Earning money online as an “Asana Consultant” was weird enough that I added it to my Weird Ways People Make Money Online article.

There are now 28 weird ways listed there.

Two more I added recently:

That’ll do it for this week.

Was there anything above that you found particularly useful or interesting?

I aim to pack these emails with the best tips, tools and resources for growing your online business. Your feedback helps me do that.

Also: feel free to forward this email to a friend, or you can direct them to the online version here: https://ebizfacts.com/ebiz-weekly-29/

In case you missed em, here are the last three editions of eBiz Weekly:

Until next week, rock on with your legendary self 💪


Niall Doherty – Ubud, Bali
eBiz Facts

By the way...

Freedom Business Builder
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